Yearly Archive July 21, 2020

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KFC to 3D Print Chicken Using Lab-Grown ‘Meat of the Future’

KFC to 3D Print Chicken Using Lab-Grown ‘Meat of the Future’

The fast food chain wants to develop the world’s first laboratory-produced chicken nuggets.

KFC to 3D Print Chicken Using Lab-Grown 'Meat of the Future'

Nobody does chicken—or food innovation—like KFC. The fast food chain has partnered with 3D Bioprinting Solutions in Russia to develop the world’s first laboratory-produced chicken nuggets.

Inspired by the growing demand for animal alternatives, KFC wants to craft the “meat of the future.” The project, according to a press release, aims to forge something “as close as possible in both taste and appearance” to the restaurant’s original product, while remaining environmentally friendly.

“Our experiment in testing 3D bioprinting technology to create chicken products can also help address several looming global problems,” Raisa Polyakova, general manager of KFC Russia, said in a statement. “We are glad to contribute to its development and are working to make it available to thousands of people in Russia and, if possible, around the world.”

A final product should be ready for testing this fall in Moscow, where folks are working on additive bioprinting technology that uses chicken cells and plant material to reproduce the taste and texture of meat, “almost” without involving animals. Biomeat has the same microelements of the original product without any additives (typically used in the production, processing, treatment, packaging, transportation, or storage), making it cleaner and more ethical, considering the process does not harm animals.

“3D bioprinting technologies, initially widely recognized in medicine, are nowadays gaining popularity in producing foods such as meat,” said Yusef Khesuani, co-founder of 3D Bioprinting Solutions. “In the future, the rapid development of such technologies will allow us to make 3D-printed meat products more accessible and we are hoping that the technology created as a result of our cooperation with KFC will help accelerate the launch of cell-based meat products on the market.”

KFC cites a study by the American Environmental Science & Technology Journal. It suggests growing meat from cells is also believed to have minimal negative impact on the environment, cutting energy consumption by more than half, reducing greenhouse gas emissions 25 fold, and using 100 times less land than traditional farm-based production. “At KFC, we are closely monitoring all of the latest trends and innovations and doing our best to keep up with the times by introducing advanced technologies to our restaurant networks,” Polyakova added. “Crafted meat products are the next step in the development of our ‘restaurant of the future’ concept.”

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12 Ways You Can Absolutely Make Money Online

12 Ways You Can Absolutely Make Money Online

For many people, making money online would be an absolute dream come true. If they could find a way to make money with a website or some other online venture, they could quit their job to focus on entrepreneurship, spend more time with their family, and finally take back control of their time and their lives.

The crazy thing is, earning money online isn’t a pipe dream. I have been doing it for nearly a decade now with my website Good Financial Cents. I also know thousands of other people who are earning money online their own way with websites, courses, or unique marketing strategies.

Now, here’s the good news. The majority of online revenue strategies aren’t that complicated. Like any business venture, your online income takes time to grow. You need to be willing to devote the time and energy required to get your idea off the ground, and you need grit to stick with it even if your journey is slow when you first start out.

If you’re angling to earn money online but aren’t sure where to start, here are several of the best and most realistic strategies to consider:

#1: Google Adsense

If you’ve visited any website, you’ve seen Google ads. These ads are everywhere, and for good reason. Not only are they easy to set up on any basic website, but they can be lucrative once your website starts bringing in a steady amount of traffic.

One of the cool things about Google AdSense is that it’s so easy to get set up. If you have a blog or website, you can sign up for a free Google AdSense Account. From there, Google will give you a unique code that you will paste onto your website. Google takes it from there, tracking your page views, traffic, and earnings on your behalf. There is no upkeep or maintenance to get this thing going, which makes it a no-brainer if you have a website already.

How much will you make? I think my best month with Google AdSense was almost $5,000 over the last ten years. That amazing month blew my mind since it was actually near the beginning of my blogging journey. When you go from making zero to $5,000 in a month, that will rock your world. For me, it also got me even more excited because I knew there were other ways to monetize.

#2: Affiliate Marketing

Whether you have a website or are still dreaming up ideas for a blog, you can also look into affiliate marketing. With affiliate marketing, you partner with brands and businesses within the content of your website. If you mention a product or service, you link to that produce or service using a unique affiliate code you received when you signed up for that particular affiliate program. From there, you’ll make money any time someone buys a product or service through your link.

Generally speaking, you’ll want to partner with affiliates that are related to your blog concept. Since I’m a financial advisor, I have focused a lot of my affiliate energy on financial products like savings accounts, credit cards, and investment accounts.

In addition to signing up for individual affiliate programs, you can also sign up for an affiliate ad network that offers a ton of different affiliates in one place. That way, you can see what works and what doesn’t work over time.

If you’re looking for inspiration, my friend Michelle Schroeder-Gardner of the website Making Sense of Sense has become the expert on all things affiliate marketing. Michelle earns more than $100,000 per month from her blog and the bulk of her income comes from affiliate sales. Michelle has had so much success with affiliate marketing that she even has her own course called Making Sense of Affiliate Marketing.

While Michelle works with a ton of affiliates in the financial services industry, one of her biggest affiliates is a blog hosting company called Bluehost. This just goes to show that you can make money with nearly any affiliate company or product if you know your audience and build up enough traffic to create sales.

#3: Consulting

Another way to make money online is via consulting. If you’re an expert in any field, you could potentially find people willing to pay you to counsel them on their personal or business goals. You might think you’re not important enough to consult for big companies, but you could be surprised at the types of expertise people will pay for.

My colleague Robert Farrington of The College Investor is a good example of someone who consulted online on the side in an unlikely industry. Robert told me that, after he had been blogging for a few years, a couple of brands reached out to him to ask him for help with social media and online marketing.

Robert said he did an average of 4-6 of these gigs per year for a while depending on his schedule and the work involved. The best part is, he charged a flat rate that usually worked out to around $100 per hour. And remember, this was pay he was earning to advise people on the best ways to use social media tools like Facebook and Pinterest to grow their brands.

If you want to start consulting but aren’t sure what steps to take next, you can also set up a free account through Clarity.fm. This website lets anyone who wants to offer consulting set up a free profile. Once your profile is set up, people will find you and book a session you’ll get paid for.

#4: Online Courses

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If you have any skill you can teach others, it’s also possible to set up an online course you can market online. You can find online courses that teach anything from cooking to marketing or even freelance writing. Heck, I even offer my own course for financial advisors who want to take their businesses online— The Online Advisor Growth Formula.

Last year, I profiled my friend Joseph Michael of Easy Course Creation. Michael offers several different courses, including courses on a writing software called “Scrivener.” Over the years, Michael has earned six figures or more annually selling courses that help people achieve the kind of success he has earned.

Most people set up their online course through a platform like Teachable.com. With Teachable, you can upload your course materials and use the platform to manage customers and accept payments.

#5: Podcasting

Another way to make money online is by hosting an online podcast. I have the Good Financial Cents podcast to go along with my blog, and I use that platform to find new sponsors and advertisers all the time.

I still remember getting my first sponsor on the podcast and finding out they were willing to pay $8,000 for me to include a short clip at the beginning of each podcast for 90 days. That was insanely exciting to me at the time since I wasn’t sure I would be able to monetize my podcast that much at first.

However, there are tons of people making a lot more than me on their podcasts. Take the Entrepreneur On Fire Podcast hosted by John Lee Dumas. According to the show’s most recent income report, this podcast brought in a net income of over $400,000 in March 2018. Now, that’s crazy.

The key to getting ahead with podcasting is finding your niche, growing an audience, and then finding ways to monetize and connect with sponsors. This isn’t the easiest way to make money online since there are a lot of logistics that go into writing, recording, and editing a podcast, but it is still worth considering.

#6: Book Sales

While the publishing industry used to be heavy in print, you can complete the entire process of writing, publishing, and marketing a book online these days. Websites like Create Space will let you upload and take your book to print without getting a formal publisher involved, and you can even get your book on Amazon.com so people can buy it there.

A blogger I know named Joseph Hogue has a successful blog (My Work from Home Money) and a thriving book publishing business. Hogue has written several books he has published online to create an ongoing source of passive income. He says he averages about 685 books sold per month to bring in an average of $1,857 in revenue. Not bad, huh?

If you think you could write a book people would want to buy, this is a smart strategy to consider since the start-up costs can be minimal and you probably already have a computer and word processing software anyway.

#7: Lead Sales

Another way to make money online is by collecting leads. The main steps you need to complete to make lead sales work include setting up a website, getting traffic to that website, and making sure you’re collecting leads that someone will actually pay for.

Here’s a good example of how lead sales can work in real life: My second website, Life Insurance by Jeff, brings in a ton of traffic from people who are searching the web to find answers to life insurance questions. While I used to have the website set up so I could sell these people life insurance myself, it was a lot of work to process all the different requests and clients. As a result, I started selling the leads I gathered instead.

Basically, lead buyers are willing to pay for the personal information I gather from people who visit my website. This is a win-win for everyone since I get paid for the leads and my website visitors are connected with someone who can help them.

Keep in mind though, you can sell leads in many different industries —not just life insurance. Really, you just need to figure out a niche, build a website and traffic, and see how much you can get for the leads you collect.

#8: Freelance Writing

If you have writing skills and creative talent, it’s also possible to get paid to create online content. I don’t do this as much as I used to, but I am very aware of how viable this income stream is.

One blogger I know, Holly Johnson, actually makes over $200,000 per year creating content for other websites. And actually, that’s on top of the six figures she earns with her blog, Club Thrifty.

Holly told me she started writing content in 2011. At the time, she still worked a full-time job but created content online part-time to supplement her income. Over time, she was able to double and triple her rates until she could quit her full-time job to write. These days, she makes bank as a freelance writer and teaches others to do the same via her online course, Earn More Writing.

According to Johnson, the key to making it as a freelance writer is figuring out a niche, networking with people who might hire you, and delivering high quality content 100 percent of the time. While there are a ton of writing job boards to help you get started, she says it’s fairly easy to find starter writing jobs on websites like Upwork.com.

#9: Sponsored Posts

If you have a website or a large social media following, you can also make money by pursuing sponsored posts and ads. But, how does this work? Basically, companies are willing to pay bloggers and social media influencers to promote their products and services. If you have a platform, be it a blog or a huge Instagram following, you can cash in.

The first time I got a sponsored post for Good Financial Cents, I was totally blown away. I think I got paid only $100, but that was a lot of money to me at the time. Later on, however, I realized companies that wanted a sponsored post really just wanted a link from my website to their own site. For that reason, I started increasing my rates.

These days, I charge around $4,500 for a sponsored post. Plus, I clearly mark all sponsored content as an #ad to stay in compliance with Google’s terms and conditions. I also only promote companies I use or believe in.

But, I also know bloggers that get $20,000 for a sponsored post. That’s pretty crazy, but it just goes to show what is possible.

Keep in mind though, you don’t need a website to do sponsored content since you can also get paid if you have a lot of social media followers. My wife has a pretty big Instagram following, and she gets all kinds of sponsorships. Not only does she get paid in cash, but we get a lot of free stuff, too. We’ve received free rugs, free lights, and free carpet cleaners. She only promotes things she loves though, so this strategy works really well for her.

#10: Webinars

Need more ideas on how to make money online? Another strategy is using webinars to market your product, service, or course. I’ve done webinars to promote my financial planning practice and to drum up interest in my online course for financial advisors. With a webinar, you’re basically offering a lot of tips and advice for free — usually in a live format. At the end though, you pitch your paid product or service with the goal of securing a few deals.

Professional speaker Grant Baldwin uses webinars to market his courses on public speaking, including Get Booked and Paid to Speak. While Baldwin offers plenty of free tips during his webinar, he offers his course at the end for people who want to pay to learn more. And, a lot of times, his sales pitch works.

No matter what you’re selling, it’s not that hard to set up a webinar and attract people to sign up with a lead magnet or Facebook ads. Heck, you can probably find a free webinar on how to create your first webinar if you look hard enough.

#11: YouTube

YouTube is another platform that has made it possible for people to earn money online. There are a ton of YouTube channels out there on any topic if you can think of, and most of the people with a big following are earning some money in exchange for their videos and time.

Marine officer turned men’s fashion expert, Antonio Centeno has built a million dollar business from his YouTube channel, Real Men Real Style.

Last year, Forbes profiled some of the biggest players in the YouTube scene. According to the study, the top ten biggest grossing YouTube stars brought in $127 million from June 2016 to June 2017. The most popular, a gamer named DanTDM, earned $16.5 million of that on his own.

Will you earn that much? Probably not. However, you can start making money via YouTube using the platform’s own ad network or by getting sponsored posts. If you like doing videos, starting a YouTube channel can a fun way to earn some cash on the side.

#12: Build an Online Community

Last but not least, you can also earn money online by building an online community, although the monetization strategies you can pursue will vary a lot depending on your goals. You can build a community with a blog, for example. You can also build an online forum and charge people for membership. You could even build up a Facebook group and use your influence there to sell and promote products.

My good friends Shane and Jocelyn Sams have become experts in building online communities.  They have one right now for their website – Flipped Lifestyle. This community shows people how to create an online business and connects entrepreneurs who are pursuing similar dreams.

Prior to that group, they had an online community for teachers looking for lesson plans. That probably sounds pretty random, but it’s crazy the type of communities you can build and rally people around. If it’s something that you’re passionate about yourself and you want to connect with others that have that same passion, then an online community is something you should definitely consider.

The Bottom Line

There are a ridiculous number of ways to make money online and the ones I’ve covered here are just the tip of the iceberg. If you have time, a passion for almost anything, and at least some creative skill, you may be able to build an online income stream — or several — if you give it enough time.

But, don’t just take my word for it. If you look online, you’ll find thousands of success stories you can use for inspiration.

One day you could even create a success story of your own. But you’ll never know unless you try.

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IIS Crypto Download

IIS Crypto requires Windows Server 2008 and the .Net 4.0 framework or greater. Both GUI and command line versions are available.

 

IIS Crypto GUI

Version 3.2 (342 KB)

DOWNLOAD

 

IIS Crypto CLI

Version 3.2 (246 KB)

DOWNLOAD

Version 3.2 Build 16 – Released April 11, 2020

  • Added override enabled feature to set Procotols Enabled to 1 instead of 0xffffffff
  • Only a single instance of IIS Crypto can be run

Version 3.1 Build 15 – Released December 19, 2019

  • Changed the target platform to AnyCPU
  • Updated code signing certificate
  • Crash on Windows Server 2008 R2 with older versions of .Net

Version 3.0 Build 14 – Released February 10, 2019

  • Advanced tab for additional registry settings
  • Backup current registry settings
  • Separate check list box for client side protocols
  • Simplified template file format
  • Strict template
  • List HTTPS sites from IIS for the Site Scanner
  • Reboot checkbox on the GUI
  • Windows Server 2019 support
  • TLS 1.1 and 1.2 in Windows 2008 Server first release
  • Best Practices and PCI 3.2 templates remove the TLS_RSA_WITH_3DES_EDE_CBC_SHA cipher suite
  • PCI template has been updated to PCI version 3.2
  • All templates disable the FIPS Algorithm Policy except for FIPS 140-2
  • Set DHE Minimum Server Length to 2048 for Best Practices, PCI 3.2 and Strict templates
  • Automatic upgrade of old template file format
  • Force TLS 1.2 connections when using Check for Updates
  • If the registry value type is incorrect, IIS Crypto changes it to the correct type
  • Invalid cast error when loading keys from the registry that are not the correct type
  • Saving templates do not include the version nor is the header copied
  • If a template is newer than the version expected, it reverts back to server defaults instead of just leaving the current settings
  • Spelling mistakes

Version 2.0 Build 11 – Released July 15, 2016

  • Full version information to About tab
  • Crash when run from a network share

Version 2.0 Build 10 – Released July 8, 2016

  • Complete application and GUI redesign
  • Built-in and custom templates support
  • Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016 support
  • Schannel client side protocols
  • Automatic and manual check for updates
  • All cipher suites are loaded from the OS list of defaults
  • Add your own cipher suites if they are not in the OS list of defaults
  • PCI 3.1 template
  • Custom templates in the same folder as IIS Crypto are added to the template list automatically
  • Reboot switch for the console application
  • Dropped support for Windows 2003 and lower
  • Changed cipher suite order for Best Practices template and now includes DSA certificates
  • UI is now resizable
  • Warning messages for disabling TLS 1.0 in Windows Server 2008 and 2008 R2 for RDP support
  • Executables are now dual signed with SHA1 and SHA256
  • Console application now takes built-in templates and external files as parameters
  • Triple DES 168/168 was renamed to Triple DES 168 for Windows Server 2008 and newer
  • Unchecking all cipher suites when none are specified caused all to be checked instead of unchecked

Version 1.6 Build 7 – Released November 17, 2014

  • Additional cipher suites for all platforms due to MS14-066
  • Triple DES 168/168 was changed to Triple DES 168 in Vista/2008 and newer
  • PCI button now disables SSL 3.0 and RC4 128/128
  • Missing cipher suites TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_GCM_SHA384, TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256

Version 1.5 Build 6 – Released November 8, 2014

  • New cipher suites: TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_256_GCM_SHA384, TLS_DHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256, TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_GCM_SHA384 and TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_GCM_SHA256 for Windows 2012 R2
  • New hashes: SHA 256, SHA 384 and SHA 512
  • New key exchange: ECDH
  • Check all and uncheck all buttons for the cipher suite order
  • Best Practices has updated the cipher suite order to exclude RC4 encryption and DSA certificates
  • Disabled SSL 3.0 for Best Practices because of the POODLE attack
  • Hide TLS 1.1 and 1.2 for Windows 2008 (not R2) and lower
  • IIS Crypto now looks for both 0xffffffff and 0x1 for Enabled values in the registry
  • Warning message if TLS 1.0 is unchecked and Remote Desktop is set to use it
  • Cipher suite order for TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA256_P521 and TLS_ECDHE_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA_P521

Version 1.4 Build 5 – Released November 5, 2013

  • Best practices template and command line option
  • Help button with FAQ link
  • Qualys SSL server test
  • Cipher suites are no longer loaded from the registry as they are not all included
  • Cipher suites are listed in the best practices order if none have been selected
  • Cipher suites are only checked or unchecked when the checkbox is clicked
  • Reordered the template buttons
  • Removed the BEAST template button and command line option

Version 1.3 Build 4 – Released December 12, 2012

  • .Net 4.0 executables for Windows 2012
  • BEAST button and command line option to re-order the cipher suite to put RC4 at the top
  • Message for unsupported SSL Cipher Suite Order in Windows 2003
  • Minor GUI issues

Version 1.2 Build 3 – Released August 28, 2012

  • Invalid timestamp for executable signature
  • When running under a non-administrator account, IIS Crypto crashes with a System.Security.SecurityException

Version 1.1 Build 2 – Released February 26, 2012

  • A new command line version
  • License agreement dialog on first run
  • Warning dialog if the SSL Cipher Suite Order is changed
  • Default settings are now restored after the Apply button is clicked
  • DisabledByDefault is set for protocols, this will fix support for TLS 1.1 and TLS 1.2
  • SSL Cipher Suite Order not being displayed correctly

Version 1.0 Build 1 – Released May 6, 2011

  • Initial version
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Bitcoin vs. Bitcoin Cash: What Is the Difference?

Bitcoin vs. Bitcoin Cash: What Is the Difference?

 

Bitcoin vs. Bitcoin Cash: An Overview

Since its inception, there have been questions surrounding bitcoin’s ability to scale effectively. Transactions involving the digital currency bitcoin are processed, verified, and stored within a digital ledger known as a blockchain. Blockchain is a revolutionary ledger-recording technology. It makes ledgers far more difficult to manipulate because the reality of what has transpired is verified by majority rule, not by an individual actor. Additionally, this network is decentralized; it exists on computers all over the world.

The problem with blockchain technology in the Bitcoin network is that it’s slow, especially in comparison to banks that deal with credit card transactions. Popular credit card company Visa, Inc. (V), for instance, processes close to 150 million transactions per day, averaging roughly 1,700 transactions per second. The company’s capability actually far surpasses that, at 65,000 transaction messages per second.1

How many transactions can the bitcoin network process per second? Seven.2 Transactions can take several minutes or more to process. As the network of bitcoin users has grown, waiting times have become longer because there are more transactions to process without a change in the underlying technology that processes them.

Ongoing debates around bitcoin’s technology have been concerned with this central problem of scaling and increasing the speed of the transaction verification process. Developers and cryptocurrency miners have come up with two major solutions to this problem. The first involves making the amount of data that needs to be verified in each block smaller, thus creating transactions that are faster and cheaper, while the second requires making the blocks of data bigger, so that more information can be processed at one time. Bitcoin Cash (BCH) developed out of these solutions. Below, we’ll take a closer look at how bitcoin and BCH differ from one another.

KEY TAKEAWAYS

  • Bitcoin is limited by transaction processing time, an issue which has caused rifts between factions within the bitcoin mining and developing communities.
  • Bitcoin Cash was started by bitcoin miners and developers concerned about the future of the bitcoin cryptocurrency, and its ability to scale effectively.
  • While bitcoin blocks are limited to 1 MB, BCH blocks are 8 MB.

 

Bitcoin

In July 2017, mining pools and companies representing roughly 80 percent to 90 percent of bitcoin computing power voted to incorporate a technology known as a segregated witness, called SegWit2x.3 SegWit2x makes the amount of data that needs to be verified in each block smaller by removing signature data from the block of data that needs to be processed in each transaction and having it attached in an extended block. Signature data has been estimated to account for up to 65 percent of data processed in each block, so this is not an insignificant technological shift. Talk of doubling the size of blocks from 1 MB to 2 MB ramped up in 2017 and 2018, and, as of February 2019, the average block size of bitcoin increased to 1.305 MB, surpassing previous records. By January 2020, however, block size has declined back toward 1 MB on average.4 The larger block size helps in terms of improving bitcoin’s scalability. In September 2017, research released by cryptocurrency exchange BitMex showed that SegWit implementation had helped increase the block size, amid a steady adoption rate for the technology.5

 

Bitcoin Cash

Bitcoin Cash is a different story. Bitcoin Cash was started by bitcoin miners and developers equally concerned with the future of the cryptocurrency and its ability to scale effectively. However, these individuals had their reservations about the adoption of a segregated witness technology. They felt as though SegWit2x did not address the fundamental problem of scalability in a meaningful way, nor did it follow the roadmap initially outlined by Satoshi Nakamoto, the anonymous party that first proposed the blockchain technology behind cryptocurrency. Furthermore, the process of introducing SegWit2x as the road forward was anything but transparent, and there were concerns that its introduction undermined the decentralization and democratization of the currency.

In August 2017, some miners and developers initiated what is known as a hard fork, effectively creating a new currency: BCH. BCH has its own blockchain and specifications, including one very important distinction from bitcoin. BCH has implemented an increased block size of 8 MB to accelerate the verification process, with an adjustable level of difficulty to ensure the chain’s survival and transaction verification speed, regardless of the number of miners supporting it.6

Bitcoin Cash is thus able to process transactions more quickly than the Bitcoin network, meaning that wait times are shorter and transaction processing fees tend to be lower. The Bitcoin Cash network can handle many more transactions per second than the Bitcoin network can. However, with the faster transaction verification time comes downsides as well. One potential issue with the larger block size associated with BCH is that security could be compromised relative to the Bitcoin network. Similarly, bitcoin remains the most popular cryptocurrency in the world as well as the largest by market cap, so users of BCH may find that liquidity and real-world usability is lower than for bitcoin.

The debate about scalability, transaction processing and blocks has continued beyond the fork which led to Bitcoin Cash. In November of 2018, for example, the Bitcoin Cash network experienced its own hard fork, resulting in the creation of yet another derivation of bitcoin called Bitcoin SV. Bitcoin SV was created in an effort to stay true to the original vision for bitcoin that Satoshi Nakamoto described in the bitcoin white paper while also making modifications to facilitate scalability and faster transaction speeds.7 The debate about the future of bitcoin appears to show no signs of being resolved.

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